The Wendel Family of NY-A Very Unusual Dynasty

A recent NYTimes (April 10, 2016) profiles the Wendel family – NY real estate tycoons who avoided publicity and luxury, refused to sell their holdings and drove the city crazy. According to the article by Julie Sadow, the Wendels owned more than 150 properties in NYC which would be valued today at more than $1billion. The family (six sisters and a brother)- all unamrried, lived together in a shuttered mansion at Fifth Avenue and 39th Street. Their financial strategy was never mortgage property, never pay for repairs and never forget that Broadway moves uptown at a rate of 10 blocks a decade. In their day they paid more real estate taxes than anyone else. Sometimes they would have buildings sit vaccant if they could not find the tenant they wanted. They refused to rent to saloons, restaurants or theaters. Sometimes they were generous deeply discounting rents for those who could not afford it or keeping a vacant lot for children as a playground. According to the article in the Times after the parents death the brother lorded over his sisters and opposed any matrimonial unions as it would disperse the family wealth- only one sister ever married and it was after her brother’s death. She was too old to have children. The last surviving sibling left the fortune to charities. 2003 “relatives” came forward to challenge the estate.
One can only wonder what the intended legacy was – survival of the immediate family differs from dynastic survival, dispersion to charities is not a perpetual foundation. It is fascinating that a family can have the fortiutde to build this dynasty, not see the parth to family survival, the impact of procreation or the ability to hold dynastic wealth together as what would have appeared to have been a signficant part of their legacy.

Is it Reasonable to Expect Alimony for Your Eggs?

human eggsA previous New York Times article had an op-ed piece by Sarah Elizabeth Richards, author of “Motherhood Rescheduled: The New Frontier of Egg Freezing and the Women Who Tried It”.

In that op-ed piece Ms. Richards discusses the case of a 38 year old woman who is asking her soon to be ex-husband of 8 years to pay $20,000 to cover the cost of her egg freezing procedure, medication costs and several years of egg storage on the grounds that when they got married they started with the expectation they would start a family and now she may not have that chance much longer.

The couple had been unsuccessful in fertility treatments and as part of her legal case she is arguing that since fertility treatments were part of the marriage, they should be considered part of the marital lifestyle, which should be maintained as long as possible post-divorce.

The lawyer representing the woman is quoted in the article as saying that he hopes the case settles out of court. Should this go to court it would be a case of first impression in the country and we will all be watching what happens.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/07/opinion/alimony-for-your-eggs.html?_r=0

 

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning. She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about. Annino recently released her new book, “It’s More Than Money, Protect Your Legacy” available at Amazon.com. To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

Oliver Sacks: The visionary who can’t recognise faces

Oliver sacks imageThis is such an inspirational story – I hope you enjoy it!

The scientist and writer Oliver Sacks has said his “luck has run out” after revealing that he has terminal cancer.

Sacks, whose book Awakenings inspired the Oscar-nominated film of the same name, disclosed his illness in an article in the New York Times.

The London-born academic, made a CBE in the 2008 birthday honors, said: “A month ago, I felt that I was in good health, even robust health. At 81, I still swim a mile a day. But my luck has run out – a few weeks ago I learned that I have multiple metastases in the liver.”

He said it came after a previous diagnosis nine years ago and he is now “face to face with dying”.

He wrote: “It is up to me now to choose how to live out the months that remain to me. I have to live in the richest, deepest, most productive way I can.”

Sacks said he would no longer watch the evening news, or pay attention to arguments over politics or climate change.

“I still care deeply about the Middle East, about global warming, about growing inequality, but these are no longer my business; they belong to the future,” he wrote.

He admitted he had some fear about dying, and discussed the sadness of seeing friends and loved ones die before him. “Over the last few days, I have been able to see my life as from a great altitude, as a sort of landscape, and with a deepening sense of the connection of all its parts. This does not mean I am finished with life,” he wrote. “On the contrary, I feel intensely alive, and I want and hope in the time that remains to deepen my friendships, to say farewell to those I love, to write more.”

Sacks is the author of several books about unusual medical conditions including The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and The Island of the Colourblind.

Awakenings was based on his work with patients treated with a drug that woke them up after years in a catatonic state. The 1991 film version, starring Robert De Niro and Robin Williams, was nominated for three

Source: The Guardian/UK http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/feb/20/oliver-sacks-reveals-terminal-cancer Photograph: Brad Barket/Getty Images

 

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning. She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about. Annino recently released her new book, “It’s More Than Money, Protect Your Legacy” available at Amazon.com. To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

Death Knell for Opera in San Diego After 49 Years

By ADAM NAGOURNEY

SAN DIEGO — Molly Whittaker is a chorus member with the San Diego Opera, where she has performed for Ian D. Campbell and ex-wife Ann Spira Campbell, San Diego Opera Executivesalmost 10 years. But the other evening she could be found outside the opera hall, wearing a bright red T-shirt reading “Fight for San Diego Opera,” and thrusting pamphlets and stickers at patrons as they arrived for a performance of Massenet’s “Don Quixote.”

“I’m trying to draw attention to myself,” she said, a note of urgency in her voice. The opera company announced last month that it would shut down after 49 years with the end of the run of “Don Quixote,” and she was on the front lines of a campaign to save it.

“I came home from babysitting, and it was on the news,” she said. “I fell on my knees and cried for two days.”

Ms. Whittaker appears to have failed. After a three-week battle that convulsed the community here and subjected its once revered opera company to widespread derision and accusations of mismanagement — Ian D. Campbell, its general and artistic director, was nearly booed off the stage when he stepped out to introduce “Don Quixote” this month on opening night — the board of directors on Friday reaffirmed its intention to close down. The final scheduled performance was on Sunday.

People here were certainly aware that their opera company, like so many others, was struggling with declining attendance and revenues. But the news still seemed to come as a shock, no matter how many urgent fund-raising appeals the troupe sent out. “You just get kind of used to that and take it with a grain of salt,” said Violet Huprich, 77, a retired teacher. “But there was no indication there was going to be a complete failure, that it was going to go down.”

The crisis comes at a time when even the Metropolitan Opera is struggling with many of the same kinds of problems and soon after the drawn-out demise of New York City Opera, which closed for different reasons. The seeming end of the line for this San Diego institution, the country’s 10th-largest opera company, gave fresh cause for alarm about the future of opera, and particularly regional opera. Unless there is a last-minute reprieve — a committee of four board members is making one final effort to find one — this metropolis of 3.1 million people, which prides itself as culturally rich, will have no place to see opera, short of chancing a drive to Los Angeles that can take anywhere from two-and-a-half hours to four hours each way.

Keturah Stickann, the New York-based director of “Don Quixote,” before a performance on Tuesday. “It’s known for bringing in the best in the world and has been for years and years and years.”

By the end, nightly attendance at the 2,500-seat Civic Theater here — the opera did not have its own hall — had fallen below 70 percent, even with seats discounted to fill the house. Ticket sales dropped to 34,674 last year from 41,355 in 2010. The Sunday performance was, not surprisingly, sold out, a bittersweet reminder of an earlier time.

Continue reading the main story

“ ‘Elixir of Love,’ which got great reviews, still sold just 68 percent,” said Karen Cohn, chairwoman of the San Diego Opera, referring to a production of the Donizetti opera in February. “Lowest in our history. It was just devastating for us.”

It was a one-two punch: Even as ticket sales were dropping, the opera was depleting a $10.5 million endowment left to it by Joan Kroc — who died in 2003 and was the widow of Ray A. Kroc, who built the McDonald’s empire — to cover operating deficits. The Kroc fund is projected to be spent by the end of this month.

“Even if we sold out, the tickets are only covering 38 percent of the cost,” Ms. Cohn said. “Our donors are passing away; I don’t know if people are not being raised with opera in the United States any longer, but we are not selling out the operas anymore. Not even close.”

In the end, she said, the choice was to close “with dignity” now or proceed with a 2015 season that has already been scheduled and posted online — Wagner’s “Tannhäuser,” John Adams’s “Nixon in China,” Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” and Puccini’s “La Bohème,” complete with contracted singers who will still have to be paid — and face the embarrassment of an inevitable bankruptcy.

The drama in San Diego was particularly pitched and sudden, all the more striking given the context of the long, slow decline of New York City Opera.

“The leadership is just throwing in the towel,” said Carlos Cota, the business agent for the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees Local 122, which represents opera workers in San Diego. “It’s just going to leave a dramatic void in our city.”

There has been no shortage of second-guessing the decision to close, and questioning whether the company did everything it might have — from considering smaller stages that might reduce ticket costs to being more experimental with its programming to attract new audience members. The disclosure of high executive salaries — Mr. Campbell made $489,000 last year, while his former wife, Ann Spira Campbell, who is deputy general director, drew $274,000 — only fanned the anger.

The sudden and mysterious decision to close also fed a storm of rumors that the two were trying to protect any severance payments. The board issued a statement from an independent lawyer saying that they would be treated the same as other opera creditors.

The troupe had a $15 million budget this year and was, unlike other companies, deficit free.
“A lot of opera companies face the same challenges,” said Marc A. Scorca, president of Opera America, an advocacy organization. “But other opera companies have soldiered on through creative reinvention, cutbacks in order to stabilize. They are going forward with a more diverse public program and a more diverse audience.”

“I think this is a story about one opera company,” he said. “It describes not the state of opera but the state of the company.”

Ms. Stickann said opera companies in Houston, Chicago and San Francisco had embraced change with no harm to their reputation. “These places are bringing in world-class musical theater and world-class chamber work, and I think that these are both options that would bring in a larger audience or a different audience,” Ms. Stickann said.

The concern echoed across the country. “They are dealing with the same head winds that all nonprofits are dealing with and they chose to pull the plug,” Christopher Koelsch, president of the Los Angeles Opera, said. “The things that were cited are some of the things that all of us have to deal with and the challenge to all of us is to adapt.”

Mr. Campbell disputed the notion that the board had not acted to avoid this moment, noting that it had cut back productions to four a year from five, and trimmed the staff. There was, he said, nothing left to do.
“We knew the problem was coming,” he said. “We took rather dramatic action in cutting expenses. Nobody stepped back. We all tried to do what we could. These are the cold, hard facts rather than emotions.”
Liam Dillon contributed reporting from San Diego, and Michael Cooper from New York.

A version of this article appears in print on April 14, 2014, on page C1 of the New York edition with the headline: Death Knell for Opera in San Diego After 49 Years.

Source: New York Times

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning. She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about. Annino recently released her new book, “It’s More Than Money, Protect Your Legacy” available at Amazon.com. To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

Author Patricia Annino To Release New Estate Planning Book Benefiting Families

New Book_NEWAuthor and attorney, Patricia Annino, a nationally recognized authority on estate planning will soon be releasing her next book, It’s More Than Money: Protect Your Legacy, both a how-to-do-it blueprint, and a handbook designed to provoke family discussion, understanding and unity.

Is each generation of your family aware of the “family brand” – the foundational values you want them all to share? Have you discussed the objectives – in business or philanthropy or investments or family activities – that will translate those values into a family plan?  Do you have the enabling structure (legal estate and business planning documents, financial investments and the team of advisors) in place to carry out the plan?

Most families cannot answer “yes” to all these questions.

Directed at the “Captain of the ship” the head of the family, but written in a way that is accessible to all interested family members,  It’s More Than Money: Protect Your Legacy explains how to:

* Focus on what your values are,

* Align those values with your goals,

* Work with your team of advisors to put in place the legal documents and financial framework that will…

* Protect you, your family, your charities and your legacy.

In the coming weeks additional information will be posted to Patricia’s website. For updated information or to subscribe to Patricia’s eZine or blog, visit:  http://www.patriciaannino.com

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

 

 

An Interesting Cyberbullying Case and Diminished Privacy

In this Google world of diminished privacy many of my clients are concerned about social media postings. I found a recent Canadian cyberbullying case interesting.

In A.B. v. Bragg Communicatoins, Inc., 2012 SCC 46, a 15 year old girl found out that someone had posted a fake Facebook profile using her picture, a slightly modified version of her name and other particulars identifying her.

The picture was accompanied by unflattering commentary about the girl’s appearance along with sexually explicit references. Through her father as her guardian the girl brought an order requiring the Internet provider to disclose the identity of the persons who used the IP address to publish the profile so she could identify potential defendants for an action of defamation.

As part of her application she asked permission to anonymously seek the idenity of the creator of the profile and for a publication ban on the content of the profile. Two media groups opposed the request for anonymity and the bank.

The Supreme Court of Nova Scotia granted the request that the Internet provider disclose the information about the publisher of the profile, but denied the request for anonymity and the publication because there was insufficient evidence of specific harm to the girl.

The Judge stayed that part of his order requiring the Internet provider to disclose the publisher’s identity until either a successful appeal allowed the girl to proceed anonymously or until she filed a draft order that used her real name and her father’s real name.

It never ceases to amaze me not only how much concern there should be about what you post about yourself but also about what others outside of your control post about you (and your family).

 

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning. She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about. Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime. To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

Patricia Annino to Speak at Online Conference by Women’s Philanthropy Institute

Patricia Annino is one of the She Makes Change Speakers participating in the Online Conference presented by the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University.  We hope you are able to join Patricia and the other speakers participating in this 3-day event.

To register visit:  http://www.philanthropy.iupui.edu/courses-and-seminars/course/she-makes-change

If you have questions contact:  wpiinfo@iupui.edu

Here are the basics:

Join us for a dynamic, engaging & inspiring three-part online conference starting in September.

This high-level learning experience explores the connection between women, money, and philanthropy. Through live presentations, panel discussions and research, industry leaders and philanthropists explore how women view money, uproot perceived attitudes about money and philanthropy, and leverage these insights to change the world.

September 20

3:30-4:40EST

What Women Really Think about Money

You may be surprised. Listen and join the conversation to discuss attitudes toward money, the connection between materials and spiritual perspectives, and the implications for philanthropy.

September 27

3:30-4:40EST

Unraveling the Myths

From uncertainty to insight: join us to explore how societal attitudes, misperceptions, and gender affect philanthropic behavior.

October 4

3:30-4:40EST

Change Your Strategy and Change the World

Philanthropy is about more than money. Learn how being proactive and intentional leads to deeper awareness and fulfillment in philanthropy. Listen as women who have made a difference discuss steps you can adopt to more effectively manage your finances and philanthropy.

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Effective Planned Giving Education Programs are Essential in Today’s Uncertain Economy

Planned giving requires strong trust/reliability between donors and institutions since it typically involves a large sum of money, and the institution often will invest the money (CRUT/CRT/ CLAT circumstances specifically).  Donors will want to know about tax policies, different ways of giving and the benefits of each.  You may want to incorporate into the discussion financial advisors, tax lawyers and estate planners who can inform donors about tax benefits and provide financial flexibility.

You can present donors with various giving opportunities, elucidating how giving to organizations/institutions can result in long term financial sustainability and can help with transfers of wealth to their future generations. (Charitable Remainder UniTrust (CRUT)/Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT), and Charitable Lead Annuity Trust (CLAT).

Helping donors clarify their charitable focus and goal will affect the type of planned gift they will make. It is important that they feel extremely informed about all their options—that they know they are making the best choice for giving type and that they have a clear understanding of what an endowment is and its long term strategy/use.   Lack of clear financial/donor understanding can result in a frustrated donor.  (http://chronicle.com/article/A-Donors-Declaration-of/126936/)

Educating all donors about planned giving is important in this uncertain and challenging economic time. Donors may be concerned about their own economic future and ability to maintain their current lifestyle. If they fear that they will outlive their money and they do not want to be dependent on anyone else in later life, they may not feel comfortable making significant gifts while they are still alive.  And yet, when they become educated about the tax benefits, they may “back up” their pattern of lifetime gifting with a planned giving program.  High end donors who have given significantly over a period of time may look, when educated, at planned giving as a way to endow their lifetime gifts. In other words, they may want to ensure that the gifts they have made during their lifetimes to institutions they treasure are sustained past their own mortality. Planned giving can be a way to be sure that the gift giving pattern they established during their lifetime continues post death.

 

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

Donor Education – Educating Major Gift/Large Scale donors

Donate ImageWith large scale donors, the focus can be more on the actual output of gifts since they typically have more specific long term goals of giving compared to the low level donors.

Due to the size of their gifts, large scale donors will be interested in knowing more about tax policies and the benefits of giving large scale gifts outright compared to giving through planned giving methods.

It may be wise to incorporate into the program financial advisors who can help make donors feel secure and realize how much wealth they do have. Once donors feel more secure and are more aware of the extent of their wealth, they may donate a larger gift.

The education method must be tailored to the individual donor and what his/her goals/purposes of giving are. For example, if donors want to sponsor a fellowship, it would be good to have them meet other fellows currently in the position. In that way, they could get an idea of what type of fellowship they would be supporting and the positive contribution their gift can have.

It would also be wise to educate, cultivate, and motivate your potential major donor contacts by getting them better acquainted with your CEO and the mission and vision of your organization.  You can organize meetings with leadership or invite donors to special VIP events.

Education is a process and can have a long lead time. It can take an amazingly long time to motivate the larger scale donor sufficiently  so that he/she is giving at the target level.  The more that the donor becomes comfortable with understanding the advantages (tax, financial and social) to gifting, sees the effect of the gift and receives acknowledgement for having made the gift, the more likely it is that he/she will be comfortable with increasing his/her level of gifting.

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

So You Want to be a Cadaver? Understanding the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

In March, Dick Cheney received a heart transplant and Richard Norris a 37 year old shooting victim received the most complete facial transplant to date (including new jaw, tongue and teeth). About a year ago Charla Nash, the woman mauled by her friend’s chimpanzee, received a face and hand transplant. Susan Whitman’s husband, Joseph Helfgot died during a heart transplant operation. Ms. Whitman told The Boston Globe that she was surprised that the organ bank called and asked her if she would authorize a facial transplant. She immediately spoke to her children and the family immediately agreed to it. In the interview she stated, “It’s easy to sign up and say you are an organ donor. It is another to have your family understand and facilitate that. It is painful and takes strength and a will to do it.”

Medical science is advancing. An increasing number of individuals wish to make anatomical gifts for the purposes of transplantation or medical research. The Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (the terms of which when enacted varies from state to state) standardizes the rules concerning organ and tissue donation. Anatomical gifts may be made during life, or more commonly, after death. 

In most states a donor, or his or her health care agent, may make an anatomical gift in several ways, including: 

  1. By a statement or symbol to be imprinted on the donor’s driver’s license or identification card;
  2. By Will – (An anatomical gift made by Will, shall take effect upon the donor’s death whether or not the Will is probated. Invalidation of the Will after the donor’s death will not invalidate the gift);
  3. By verbal communication to two witnesses during a donor’s terminal illness or injury
  4. By a donor card or other record signed in the presence of two witnesses or by inclusion on a donor registry.

If the deceased individual did not make a lifetime choice to make an anatomical gift and the Will is silent then certain authorized persons can make the gift for the deceased individual. In most states the persons who can do so (in order of priority) are the health care agent, spouse, adult children, parents, adult siblings, adult grandchildren, grandparents, an adult who exhibited special care and concern for the decedent, the persons who were acting as guardians at the time of death and any person who has the authority to dispose of the decedent’s body. If there is more than one member of the class entitled to make the decision that person can do so unless they know of an objection by another member of the class. If there is an objection then the gift may be made only by a majority of the members of the class who are reasonably available. 

An anatomical gift can be changed or revoked. A person can also refuse to make an anatomical gift. This refusal can be done in writing or, in some circumstances orally. A refusal can also be made in a Will. 

The gift can be made to the following persons or organizations: 

  1. A hospital, accredited medical school, dental school, college or university, organ procurement organization or other appropriate person for research and education.
  2. An individual recipient of the part, as designated by the person making the anatomical gift.
  3. An eye bank or tissue bank.

As with most estate planning decisions, the question of whether or not to make an anatomical gift is a personal one. It is wise for you to consider now whether or not you would wish to make an anatomical gift and state your intent to those who would make that decision if you are unable to do so. For those who wish to make an anatomical gift you should make that gift in your Will. And, now that in many states your health care agent has the power to make an anatomical gift on your behalf during your lifetime you should consider updating your health care proxy to either prohibit him or her from exercising the power, or to outline the desired scope of limitations of your proxy’s ability to exercise this power. 

The official U.S. Government website for organ and tissue donation and transplantation, http://www.organdonor.gov, is maintained by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A downloadable donor card can be found at http://organandonor.gov/donor/index.htm. 

All fifty states and the District of Columbia have enacted statutes based on the Uniform Anatomical Gifts Act. The law varies from state to state and should be reviewed prior to making an anatomical gift. 

Certain organizations promote organ donation. The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) is the universal transplant network. It is a private non profit organization and operated under a federal contract with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Its goal is to increase and ensure the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of organ sharing in the national system of organ allocation and to increase the supply of donated organs that are available for transplantation. The UNOS website, www.unos.org, provides information about transplant centers in various geographic areas and about the donation of particular organs.  Donate Life America (www.donatelife.net) promotes organ donation. Its website provides general information about organ donation and contains information on organ donation in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. MatchingDonors.com (www.matchingdonors.com) is a non profit organization that matches persons needing an anatomical gift with prospective donors. 

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

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