Effective Risk Planning

Image of a womanOn the topic of risk I just came across the Family Office Exchange white paper, “Securing the Future: Managing Threats and Opportunities Through Effective Risk Planning” (October 2009) and was impressed with how thorough this study is.

I recommend it to anyone who is advising high net worth families and/or family owned businesses. Its intent is to develop a process for managing risk to diffuse reactive, irrational decision making and puts forth the best strategies for managing downside risks while emphasizing the importance of capitalizing on new opportunities for wealth enhancement.

It is a wonderful roadmap for a proactive approach for risk management across the critical issues that families face. To quote Arie de Geus, the former head of strategic planning for Royal/Dutch/Shell, “nobody can predict the future, therefore one should not try. The only relevant discussions about the future are those where we succeed in shifting the question from “whether something will happen” to the question “ What will we do if it does happen?”

For more information about the Family Office Exchange white paper visit:  https://www.familyoffice.com/knowledge-center/securing-future-managing-threats-and-opportunities-through-effective-risk-planning

My three key areas “at risk” for family business are family cohesiveness, business ownership and wealth management.  Here’s a look at what they mean:

 

Family Cohesiveness

In the area of family cohesiveness, reputation or the family brand is at risk. Traditionally this risk was triggered by a scandal that leaked out to the press. The new way this risk is triggered is through the Internet. Videos on YouTube and comments on Facebook, Twitter and other social media networks can affect your client’s family’s reputation. They can be used in divorce litigations, custody matters and employment decisions. Once viral, it is hard to remove.

The younger generation, if not educated, is not mature enough to understand the afterlife omnipresent power of the digital era. A family risk-management policy should include education about the dangers of social media and a morally binding decision among family members to understand the consequence of social media on the reputation of the entire family.

 

Business Ownership

Another risk to family cohesiveness is the impact to individual goals and life plans.

Traditional risks included the illness, death or incapacity of a key family figure.

In the family business, the new risk is the increased work lifespan of the older generation, which results in the delayed succession of the middle generation. With the older generation in good health and working longer, the individual goals plans of the middle generation may be passed over.

Intentional strategic planning and clear communication among all generations as to what the expectations are for the working lifespan and when the baton should/will pass can mitigate this new risk.

Traditional risks to business ownership and the economic sustainability of the family enterprise include the death or the divorce of a shareholder when proper planning is not put in place.

The new risk is the evolution of laws governing how assets are allocated in a divorce. In some states, gifted and inherited assets are divisible in a divorce. This does not just include what the about-to-be divorcing family member owns when married; it also includes the expectancy of what that divorcing family member will receive in the future.

Those expectancies are taken into account when determining the allocation of assets between the couple about to be divorced.

A significant side effect to this is how a hostile soon-to-be ex and their attorney will value the family business assets and put that valuation into the public realm of divorce court. The goal of that hostile divorcing member is to value that business high. That valuation may do serious damage to the estate plan of the older generation.

There is also an increased risk for the allocation of alimony. Many family businesses have phantom income that is earned during the course of the marriage that shows up on the tax return and is plowed back into the family business. At issue is how that phantom income should be treated for alimony purposes.

If it was earned during the marriage, is it marital income taken into account for alimony and child support purposes even though not actually received?

When thinking about these risks, it is important to remember that the law and the court in the jurisdiction of the divorcing spouse that will control these decisions. These risks can be mitigated by a well negotiated pre-nuptial agreement or post-nuptial agreement.

 

Wealth Management

Traditional risks related to a family’s wealth (including financial, intellectual and social assets) include the illness or death of the key family stakeholder, economic downturn and changes in the regulatory or legal environment.

The dissipation of wealth sometimes triggers new risks. With each ensuing generation, wealth is splintered. Besides that, new risks also come from the lack of creation of new wealth during turbulent economic times, the increased complexity of legal and tax matters and the increased complexity of wealth management choices.

These risks can be mitigated when the family coordinates its advisers and monitors the integration of all professional services.

The risks are further mitigated when the family embraces and encourages financial education and financial literacy across the generations. Mentoring, shadowing, exposure to the concepts and resources along the generation continuums reduces unintended consequences.

Risk taking is an essential part of getting ahead.  Be sure and invest in yourself and understand and evaluate your risks before you take them.


Patricia Annino
is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

Women in Family Business – The Importance of Clarity

By Patricia Annino, J.D., Thomas Davidow, Ed.D. & Cynthia Adams Harrison, Ed.D., LICSW

The Importance of Clarity

The more you and your husband agree to treat the business as a performance arena in which preparation is everything, the more productive your child will be. Similarly, the clearer you can be in terms of creating structures, the better off your child will be when he does enter the business. Being proactive about creating routines through governance structures or through accurate job descriptions is very helpful. If your child is already working in the business, you and your husband can discuss how to create sensible structures with appropriate boundaries. Everyone performs better when they know what’s expected and what the rules are.

Be Informed-Be Influential – Points to Remember

  • If your husband resists talking to you about the business or is upset about something at work and won’t share why, don’t take it personally and don’t give up.
  • Men and women really are different in how they think, behave, feel good about themselves and communicate.
  • When you set a limit for your husband, you are actually encouraging him: You are telling him that he is capable of achieving his goals as a businessman, husband and father.
  • It is possible to find the balance between creating objective criteria for your child’s performance in the business and maintaining family harmony.
  • There’s a difference between granting your child the automatic right to work in the business and giving him the opportunity to do so.
  • Things go best when there is consistent communication between you and your husband and between both of you and your child.

 Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

 

 

Patricia Annino Receives “Best in Wealth Management” Award

The Euromoney Legal Media Group chose Patricia Annino, Chair of Prince Lobel’s Estate Planning and Probate Practice Group, to receive the prestigious “Best in Wealth Management” award at the second annual Americas Women in Business Law Award ceremony held May 24, 2012, in New York City.

Selected from a short-list of eight well-known, highly-qualified nominees, Patricia’s award was based on extensive peer review research conducted by Euromoney’s research team, her professional accomplishments during the past 12 months, and her advocacy and influence in the field of wealth management.

Following the success of similar award ceremonies in Europe and Asia, the Americas Women in Business Law Awards was launched by Euromoney Legal Media Group to give law firms and professional services firms the recognition they deserve for their efforts in helping women advance in the legal profession.

Patricia Annino is a nationally recognized expert on estate planning and taxation, with more than 25 years of experience serving the estate planning needs of families, individuals, and owners of closely held and family businesses. She speaks regularly on many issues of concern to family owned businesses, including succession planning, risk management, managing a business with multiple stakeholders, the risk of divorce, and more. Annino is a graduate of Smith College and Suffolk University School of Law.

Patricia is the author of two widely utilized professional texts: Estate Planning in Massachusetts, and Taxwise Planning for Aging, Ill, or Incapacitated Clients. Patricia’s recent books for consumers include, Cracking the $$ Code: What Successful Men Know and You Don’t (Yet), Women in Family Business: What Keeps You up at Night, and Women & Money, A Practical Guide to Estate Planning.

About Prince Lobel

Prince Lobel Tye LLP is a full-service law firm providing a wide range of services for Fortune 1000 companies, closely held businesses, and individuals. Prince Lobel’s attorneys are guided by the highest standards of legal excellence, professionalism, and service – whether they are addressing complex business issues or providing advice on personal legal matters. Practice areas and industries served encompass corporate law, data privacy and security, domestic relations, employment law, estate planning and probate, insurance and reinsurance, intellectual property and Internet law, litigation, media law, nanotechnology, real estate, telecommunications law, construction law, environmental law, renewable energy, health care, and education. For more information, visit Prince Lobel at PrinceLobel.com.

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

Women In Family Business – The Importance of Clarity

By Patricia Annino, J.D., Thomas Davidow, Ed.D. & Cynthia Adams Harrison, Ed.D., LICSW

The Importance of Clarity

The more you and your husband agree to treat the business as a performance arena in which preparation is everything, the more productive your child will be. Similarly, the clearer you can be in terms of creating structures, the better off your child will be when he does enter the business. Being proactive about creating routines through governance structures or through accurate job descriptions is very helpful. If your child is already working in the business, you and your husband can discuss how to create sensible structures with appropriate boundaries. Everyone performs better when they know what’s expected and what the rules are.

Be Informed-Be Influential – Points to Remember

  • If your husband resists talking to you about the business or is upset about something at work and won’t share why, don’t take it personally and don’t give up.
  • Men and women really are different in how they think, behave, feel good about themselves and communicate.
  • When you set a limit for your husband, you are actually encouraging him: You are telling him that he is capable of achieving his goals as a businessman, husband and father.
  • It is possible to find the balance between creating objective criteria for your child’s performance in the business and maintaining family harmony.
  • There’s a difference between granting your child the automatic right to work in the business and giving him the opportunity to do so.
  • Things go best when there is consistent communication between you and your husband and between both of you and your child.

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

 

Gifting Ownership of the Vacation House: A Gift or a Curse?

Ben Franklin once said that fish and houseguests smell after three days. But what if the houseguest co-owns the house? The perils of the vacation home, what to do with it, who should own it and what the rules are can be a source of family satisfaction and family conflict.

Under current law, the 2012 federal gift exemption is $5,120,000. Since many parents and grandparents are uncertain of their economic future, they may not want to gift assets that still earn income. Nor do they want to give away assets that have a low income tax basis that may be sold in the future. For these families, the vacation home is an attractive asset to consider gifting.

Gifting the vacation house to the next generation, or to a dynasty trust for the benefit of subsequent descendants, can remove that home (and any appreciation in its value) from the taxable estate. But before heading down that path, homeowners must carefully consider how that home will be owned post transfer.  We will explore three options: (i) outright ownership, (ii) an irrevocable trust (which could be a dynasty trust), and (iii) a family limited partnership or a limited liability company.

Outright Ownership

Often, the choice of making an outright gift of the vacation home is not appealing, whether the next generation owns the property as tenants in common, or as joint tenants with a right of survivorship. Many states have the right to compel a sale of that asset through a court proceeding, so the ownership of the home may be divisible in a divorce and subject to that family member’s creditors.

Also, family issues and resentments may develop with co-ownership. The child who lives out of state and never uses the home may resent sharing the expenses. Plus, with each generational transfer, the ownership becomes more fractionalized and the ownership of the asset is included in the taxable estate of each subsequent generation. There could also be conflict, such as who uses it the week of July 4th? Who pays for maintenance? Should rent be charged to cover expenses?

Irrevocable Trust (could be a dynasty trust)

A more appealing option for many families is transferring ownership of the home to an irrevocable trust. To complete the gift, the trust must be irrevocable, meaning that the donor cannot retain the ability to change, amend, or revoke its terms. The art of drafting an irrevocable trust is to remember that life is a movie not a snapshot, and that the document, while irrevocable, must also be flexible enough to contemplate the future.

The trust should address what happens to the child’s share at his or her death, whether or not the child’s spouse or stepchildren can continue to use the property in a divorce, or if the child predeceases his or her spouse. It should also address who is responsible for paying expenses, the line of succession of trustees, how the home should be furnished or updated, whether nonpaying guests may use the property, and who sets the rules for using the property.

Reasonable rules include who can use the property and when, the process for how that determination is made, whether use can be exclusive or must be open to all families all the time, payment of operating expenses, noise, cleanliness, pets, number of people, who pays for landscaping, parking, whether the property can be rented to nonfamily members, and other issues affecting the use and enjoyment of the property. The trust document can also address who has the right to determine the operating reserve and when income and/or principal may be distributed to the beneficiaries.

It may be also helpful for the donor to state intent – perhaps the use of the property is not intended to be equal, but based on relative degrees of interest in and ability to enjoy the property, and to take into account relative contributions (financial or otherwise) to its maintenance and improvement.

The document may also include a buyout provision by which one beneficiary (or beneficiary’s family) can sell his or her interest to other family members. Many families do not allow family members to cash out of their share in the home. An advantage to restricting what a family member can do to convert his or her share to liquid funds provides additional creditor protection and also helps keep that interest out of the taxable estate of subsequent descendants.

The trust should also address the mechanism by which a decision can be made to sell the home – should a decision that important be left only in the hands of the trustee? Should it include the trustees and all adults in the next generation? Should the vote be by majority or unanimous? The tension in that choice is that one family member who wants to use it more than others may block the sale for personal gain.

It is important to fund the trust with enough liquid assets to cover ongoing expenses and trustees. Future family discord might be avoided if family members who do not use the property are not expected to help cover its expenses. The funding can occur during the donor’s lifetime or at his or her death, through the donor’s estate plan. Once the property is transferred to the trust, the trustees should ensure that the property has sufficient property and casualty insurance coverage.

The trust document should also address the duration of the trust. It could end at a certain date, when the underlying asset is sold, when the trustees decide to end it, when the trustees and all adult beneficiaries agree to end it, when the Rule Against Perpetuities Period ends it, or if it is governed by a state that does not have any Rule Against Perpetuities, then it may never end.

Family Limited Partnership or Limited Liability Company.

A third choice is transferring the home to a family limited partnership or limited liability company, where the terms of the operating agreement control how the property is used. These entities are more businesslike than a trust, as they are members or partners. They offer the same benefits of the irrevocable trust, but may be more flexible. The operating agreement can provide a mechanism that allows it to be amended. If the entity is underfunded, the manager or general partner can make a capital call on the owners to contribute additional funds to the entity. As with the trust, the agreement will appoint a manager or management committee. The ownership structure can have two classes- voting and nonvoting. The transfer of ownership through sale or gift can be restricted.

Another benefit to gifting in this manner is that the valuation of the gift may have additional leverage and qualify for minority discounts or lack of marketability discounts. If the gift is not made all at once – but rather over several years – then all gifts are made off the record of the respective Registries of Deeds. In other words, the transfer to the entity is recorded initially, but ensuing gifts are transfers of the units or shares in the entity and are done within the entity itself, not in the Registry. This can save annual recording fees.  Additional benefits include income tax consequences in that each owner may have the benefit of the income and deductions flow through to his or her individual income tax returns.

Summary. Gifting the vacation house this year while the federal exemption is so high may be a very wise move. It is important for clients to think through their choice of entity and the considerations mentioned above before making this irrevocable decision.

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com

Women In Family Business-The Importance of Clarity

By Patricia Annino, J.D., Thomas Davidow, Ed.D. & Cynthia Adams Harrison, Ed.D., LICSW

The Importance of Clarity

The more you and your husband agree to treat the business as a performance arena in which preparation is everything, the more productive your child will be. Similarly, the clearer you can be in terms of creating structures, the better off your child will be when he does enter the business. Being proactive about creating routines through governance structures or through accurate job descriptions is very helpful. If your child is already working in the business, you and your husband can discuss how to create sensible structures with appropriate boundaries. Everyone performs better when they know what’s expected and what the rules are.

Be Informed-Be Influential – Points to Remember

  • If your husband resists talking to you about the business or is upset about something at work and won’t share why, don’t take it personally and don’t give up.
  • Men and women really are different in how they think, behave, feel good about themselves and communicate.
  • When you set a limit for your husband, you are actually encouraging him: You are telling him that he is capable of achieving his goals as a businessman, husband and father.
  • It is possible to find the balance between creating objective criteria for your child’s performance in the business and maintaining family harmony.
  • There’s a difference between granting your child the automatic right to work in the business and giving him the opportunity to do so.
  • Things go best when there is consistent communication between you and your husband and between both of you and your child.

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

New Risk to Family Cohesiveness: Impact to individual goals and life plans

New Risk to Family Cohesiveness: Impact to individual goals and life plans by the increasing lifespan of baby-boomer generation. Take the Steps Now to Put the Oxygen Over Your Own Face First and Decide Who Will Make Your Health and Financial Decisions If You Are Unable To Do So.

Another risk to family cohesiveness is the impact of increased lifespan to individual goals and life plans. Traditional risks included the illness, death or incapacity of a key family figure. In the family business and in the co-ownership of investment and commercial assets, the new risk is the increased work lifespan of the older generation, which results in the delayed succession of the middle generation. In essence, with the older generation in good physical and mental health and working far longer, the middle generation may in effect be knocked out of position and never get its day in the sun. By the time the older generation decides to move along, the individual goals and life plans of the middle generation may have been passed by; and the baton may be passed to the next generation. This new risk can be mitigated by intentional strategic planning and clear communication among all generations as to what the expectations are for the working lifespan and when the baton should/will pass.

Strategies to Mitigate the Risk of Increased Lifespan to the Ability to Control Your Own Health and Affairs and the Risk to Next Generation’s Life Plans:

1. Understand that estate planning is much more than what happens when you die; in an increasingly aging population that is living longer disability or incapacity planning is essential. Make sure you have in place the legal mechanisms so that you can be taken care of in the way you desire. It is important we all remember what the flight attendant says every time you board a plane- if the cabin pressure changes and the oxygen mask falls down put that mask over your own face first –it is only when you do put the mask over your own face that you will have the strength to protect others. In other words, protect yourself first.

2. Make sure the documents that will protect you if you are unable to care for yourself (Health Care Proxy and Durable Power of Attorney) are up to date and the way you want them.

A Health Care Proxy is a document in which you give the authority to an agent to make medical care decisions if he/she becomes unable to make them. The document can authorize everything, including minor and routine medical involvement, and can give the agent access to all your medical records. It can authorize someone to supervise your care if you are incapacitated, to consent to have you undergo certain types of treatment or to have them withdraw from treatment; to make hospital or nursing care arrangements; and to employ or discharge caregivers.   It can also empower the agent to make such major decisions as whether or not to terminate your life.

Under federal law, only one person at a time can be named as health care agent, but a Health Care Proxy can name a succession of people as alternatives.  This is done so that someone else can take over if, for instance, both spouses are in the same car crash, and neither one of them is in a condition to make medical decisions.  A copy of the Health Care Proxy should be given to your primary care physician and becomes part of the medical record.

As with a financial Durable Power of Attorney, in the health care area, couples usually designate each other to make medical care decisions and list their children as successor agents.  The health care agent must be someone they trust, who shares your value system, who is willing to perform the task and who has a clear understanding of what your preferences are.

It is prudent to update this document regularly, and, when it is updated, to make sure that the most recent contact information for those who have been designated to make health care decisions (including all telephone numbers and cell phone numbers) are current. If the Health Care Proxy was executed prior to The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (known as HIPPA) then the document must be updated. Under HIPPA, if you do not expressly waive your right to privacy in writing, hospitals and physicians do not have the legal right to speak with the health care agent or to release medical information to that person.

Choose a Health Care Agent. This important person may have different titles in different states (such as “health care agent,” “health proxy,” “patient advocate,”  “attorney-in-fact,” “health care representative,” or “health surrogate”), but the responsibilities are the same.  The official requirements for health care agents also vary from state to state, but most states simply specify that the person must be an adult (over 18) and must be someone who does not work for your health care provider or for an adult care facility in which you are residing.

It is good to designate both a health care agent and a successor agent (choice #1 and choice # 2), in case you need help at a time when the agent you have chosen is not available.  You should decide which child to choose, and if you have  no spouse or children, which friend or relative to choose.

In order for you to choose a health care agent wisely, it is helpful to establish a basis for evaluating potential candidates. That evaluation should include the following criteria:

1) Religious beliefs:  Since the concept of withholding artificial life supports runs contrary to the teachings of several religions – most notably the Catholic Church – it is helpful to find a health care agent who shares your  religious beliefs and your position on right-to-die issues.

2) Willingness to take on this task.

3)  Strength to act on your wishes and speak out on your behalf (even if faced with doctors, institutions, or family members who disagree).

4) Communication:  The agent is comfortable talking to you about sensitive issues and capable of listening to and absorbing what it is that you want.

5)  Separation:  This is a person who can differentiate between his/her feelings and yours and be able to do what you want done.

6)  Proximity: This is someone who either lives close or could travel quickly to be there when needed.

7)  Availability:  This person is likely to be accessible and capable of performing tasks well into the future.

8)  Personal Understanding:  He/she knows you well enough to intuit what is important to your.

9)  Negotiation skills:  He/she can mediate conflicts between family members, friends, and medical personnel.

Figuring Out What You Want: The following questions are designed to help you know yourself and to form a basis for discussion with the person you choose to execute your health care power of attorney.

1)  The Pleasures of Health:  How essential are these capabilities to your happiness?  (I.e. are they, Vital, Important, Mildly Important, Not important)

*Walking

*Enjoying the outdoors

*Eating, tasting

*Drinking

*Reading

*Attending religious services

*Listening to Music

*Watching television

*Avoiding pain and discomfort

*Being with loved ones

*Touching

*Being self-sufficient

2)  Fear Factors:  What are your biggest concerns about the end of your life?

3)  Spirituality:  How much of your comfort and support comes from religion?  From personal prayer?  From interaction with clergy?

4)  End of life: If you had the power to decide, what would the last day of your life be like?  Where would you be?  With whom?  What would you be doing?  What would your final words be?

5) Assistance Preferences Worksheet:  It is useful to discuss with your health care agent (and family members as well) the types of assistance you might want, should you need help, and to revisit this issue from time to time, because your preferences could very well change. Looking at each of the different scenarios spelled out below, think through what your preferences would be by asking yourself the following questions:

a) Would I still want to live at home?

b) Would I want caregivers hired to help me out in my home?

c) Would I want to be taken to a rehab or assisted living center?

d) Would I want family members to care for me?

e)  Would I want to live with one of my children?

f)  Would I want one of my children or a relative to live with me?

g) Would I want my health care agent to make these decisions for me?

h)  Would my answers differ if my spouse were still living at home?

-If you were unable to drive a car ___

-If you were unable to climb stairs ___

-If physical problems prevented you from being able to dress yourself ___

-If you had to use a wheelchair because you were no longer able to walk ___

-If you were unable to leave your home ___

-If your vision were seriously impaired ____

-If your hearing were seriously impaired ___

-If you needed kidney dialysis ___

-If you needed chemotherapy ____

-If you were in physical discomfort most of the time ___

-If you could no longer control you bladder ___

-If you could no longer control your bowels ___

-If you could not think clearly ___

The more you take the time now not only to think through who you wish to choose as a Health Care Proxy, but also how who would want various future scenarios to be addressed by that person, the more likely your wishes will be honored in the future.

Make sure (especially if you are in a second marriage) that you have coordinated the person chosen as your Health Care Agent with the person named as your Trustee and/or your Attorney in fact under a Durable Power of Attorney so that the decisions about your medical care and how to pay for it are coordinated.

What challenges are you facing in your estate individual goals and life plan?  Share your stores in the comment section below.

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently released an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  To download Annino’s FREE eBook, Estate Planning 101 visit, http://www.patriciaannino.com.

Women in Family Business – The Importance of Clarity!

By Patricia Annino, J.D., Thomas Davidow, Ed.D. & Cynthia Adams Harrison, Ed.D., LICSW

The Importance of Clarity

The more you and your husband agree to treat the business as a performance arena in which preparation is everything, the more productive your child will be. Similarly, the clearer you can be in terms of creating structures, the better off your child will be when he does enter the business. Being proactive about creating routines through governance structures or through accurate job descriptions is very helpful. If your child is already working in the business, you and your husband can discuss how to create sensible structures with appropriate boundaries. Everyone performs better when they know what’s expected and what the rules are.

Be Informed-Be Influential – Points to Remember

  • If your husband resists talking to you about the business or is upset about something at work and won’t share why, don’t take it personally and don’t give up.
  • Men and women really are different in how they think, behave, feel good about themselves and communicate.
  • When you set a limit for your husband, you are actually encouraging him: You are telling him that he is capable of achieving his goals as a businessman, husband and father.
  • It is possible to find the balance between creating objective criteria for your child’s performance in the business and maintaining family harmony.
  • There’s a difference between granting your child the automatic right to work in the business and giving him the opportunity to do so.
  • Things go best when there is consistent communication between you and your husband and between both of you and your child.

 Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently announced the release of an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  Annino’s book is an exhortation, resource and trusted companion for women in all facets of life.  To purchase the book visit:  http://amzn.to/hOHuEV or for more about Annino, visit: www.patriciaannino.com

 

 

Women In Family Business – Five Reasons Your Husband Won’t Slow Down to Reduce Stress

By Patricia Annino, J.D., Thomas Davidow, Ed.D. & Cynthia Adams Harrison, Ed.D., LICSW

I’m worried: My husband does too much and is under too much stress.

Most likely you’re worrying that your husband’s stress level could affect his health. If he got sick, or worse, died, you would lose him and your relationship. Although the thought may not be uppermost in your mind, you’re probably also worried that you wouldn’t know what to do about your own situation or the business, especially if you don’t know what’s going on in it. If you’ve been urging your husband to slow down and he doesn’t listen to you, here are five reasons why your pleas may be falling on deaf ears:

  1. He has always been this way. As an entrepreneur and owner of a family business, your husband has doubtless been a highly energetic, hard worker for decades, most likely since you met him. His work ethic created habits which he has held onto for decades. Old habits die hard.
  2. The business is his identity. Your husband’s definition of himself depends upon where his identity is banked. If it has been banked within the walls of the family business until now, he will have a hard time redefining himself.
  3. He needs to know he can still “cut it.” Your husband’s ego, emotions, and independence come from the idea that he can still perform effectively. Where else besides the family business is he going to get that confirmation? On the golf course? Traveling? Unlikely. As long as he remains immersed in the family business, with all its stresses and worries; as long as he is still making important decisions, he will continue to experience himself as vital. He does not want to give that up. That is why we read about highly successful CEO’s of family owned businesses who, nearing eighty insist on deciding how a fourth floor bathroom should be decorated.
  4. He doesn’t want to admit that he’s getting older. To one extent or another, we all choose to deny the reality of aging. We look at recent photos of ourselves that we don’t like, and our first thought is that the picture didn’t come out well-there must have been something wrong with the camera or the focus or the angle-instead of acknowledging that we have simply gotten older.
  5. He’s overcompensating. Although your husband may notice that it’s a little harder to get out of bed in the morning, or that a muscle hurts in a way it hasn’t before, he is still driven to feel as good as he did in his 20’s and 30’s. He doesn’t want to know that it’s harder to lift something or go all day without a break or deal with five problems at once. In order to stave off the sense of helplessness that accompanies aging and to prove that he’s not losing strength, he may go into overdrive and do more rather than less. And he’s not necessarily conscious of it.

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently announced the release of an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  Annino’s book is an exhortation, resource and trusted companion for women in all facets of life.  To purchase the book visit:  http://amzn.to/hOHuEV or for more about Annino, visit: www.patriciaannino.com

 

Women in Family Business: Setting Limits

By Patricia Annino, J.D., Thomas Davidow, Ed.D. & Cynthia Adams Harrison, Ed.D., LICSW

My husband does not accurately assess the talents and weaknesses of the children who are working in the business. How do I voice my opinion?

Whenever you and your husband talk about your children who are about to, or already have, entered the family business, your respective genders, priorities and positions relative to the business will likely affect your differing views. Most likely you want your children to be loved and treated equally, while your husband’s focus is on the performance and how that should be responded to fairly.

As natural as it is for you to protect your family’s harmony, when you express that intention vis a vis the family business, it can create a significant problem. Children working in the family business are held accountable at a much higher level of performance that they ever have before. When they are students, they may have been forgiven for less than excellent grades-“I know you got  a C, sweet heart, but next time go for an A.” Once they enter the business, however, they arein a performance arena which doesn’t allow for repeated C’s and D’s and F’s. the focus of relationship management is how to get the job done. If it were otherwise, the business would suffer, as would your children, who cannot grow without being held accountable.

Delicate Balance

In order to talk productively about your children’s talents and weaknesses, it would be useful for you both to figure out how to assess their performance clearly, fairly and objectively.

What are the criteria?

What are the standards?

What are the performance expectations?

How can you know when they are being fulfilled?

Are their job descriptions and functions clear?

How do their positions compare to “industry standards” in terms of title and compensation?

Putting a traditional business matrix on job descriptions is not the only way to evaluate the appropriate compensation for your children. Family businesses have an unwritten rule: “We take care of family,” which manifests in different ways. Your husband, as a family business owner and member, has a certain amount of privilege and leeway. Once you and he have made performance criteria objective by creating job descriptions and functions that make sense for what your children are doing in the business, you can be creative in how you meet your family needs, and how you attain family harmony, adding compensation where you want. In other words, you can find the delicate balance between holding your children accountable through objective criteria and maintain family harmony.

Patricia Annino is a sought after speaker and nationally recognized authority on women and estate planning.  She educates and empowers women to value themselves and their contributions in order to ACCOMPLISH GREAT THINGS in the world – and in so doing PROTECT THEMSELVES, those they love, and the organizations they care about.  Annino recently announced the release of an updated version of her successful book, Women and Money: A Practical Guide to Estate Planning to include recent changes in the laws that govern how we protect our assets during and beyond our lifetime.  Annino’s book is an exhortation, resource and trusted companion for women in all facets of life.  To purchase the book visit:  http://amzn.to/hOHuEV or for more about Annino, visit: www.patriciaannino.com

 

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